TICRAT

Taller Internacional de Conservación y Restauración de Arquitectura de Tierra

International Workshop on the Conservation and Restoration of Earthen Architecture

 

Traditional building skills are disappearing throughout the world. Nowhere is this more evident than in the efforts to preserve the cultural heritage defined by earthen architecture. Monuments constructed of adobe and rammed earth, when not properly preserved and maintained, are susceptible to deterioration and even collapse. In the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico, the buildings and communities of the Spanish colonial mission era represent a defining chapter of this region’s rich cultural heritage of earthen architecture, which is now divided by an international border.

Since 1994, the National Park Service (NPS) and National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have been collaborating with New Mexico-based Cornerstones Community Partnerships to conduct workshops known as TICRATs (Taller Internacional de Conservación y Restauración de Arquitectura de Tierra, International Workshop on the Conservation and Restoration of Earthen Architecture), disseminating adobe and plaster techniques to dozens of communities. TICRATs generally include NPS and INAH craftsmen and agency officials, academics, private sector building professionals, community participants and students from both sides of the border. The workshops consist of lectures, case studies, tours and most importantly, hands-on field workshops in the areas of building assessment and stabilization, adobe brick-making, and lime plaster preparation and application where Mexican and American participants work side by side in a bilingual setting.

TICRAT 2013 participants making adobe bricks, applying mud plaster and applying natural pigments

Participants from TICRAT 2013 make adobe bricks, apply mud plaster, and experiment with natural pigments.

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